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His debut recording devoted to Schumann offered a brilliant opportunity to discover the name of Samuel Hasselhorn, a young baritone deeply invested in the art of lieder. With his collaborator Joseph Middleton, he now turns to Schubert, in an insightful program evoking some of the themes dear to the Viennese master of song: nature, night-time, parting, absence, and death. Both essential and less familiar songs are featured side by side in this poignant depiction of profound self-reflection that can rank among the most moving examples of what the Romantic temperament has ever produced.
His debut recording devoted to Schumann offered a brilliant opportunity to discover the name of Samuel Hasselhorn, a young baritone deeply invested in the art of lieder. With his collaborator Joseph Middleton, he now turns to Schubert, in an insightful program evoking some of the themes dear to the Viennese master of song: nature, night-time, parting, absence, and death. Both essential and less familiar songs are featured side by side in this poignant depiction of profound self-reflection that can rank among the most moving examples of what the Romantic temperament has ever produced.
3149020943854
Schubert: Glaube Hoffnung Liebe Lieder
Artist: Samuel Hasselhorn / Middleton,Joseph
Format: CD
New: Available $19.98
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Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Schubert: Glaube, Hoffnung Und Liebe, D. 955
2. Schubert: Sehnsucht, D. 636
3. Schubert: An Den Mond in Einer Herbstnacht, D. 614
4. Schubert: Lied Eines Schiffers An Die Dioskuren, D. 360
5. Schubert: Totengräbers Heimweh, D. 842
6. Schubert: Der Blinde Knabe, D. 833
7. Schubert: Erlkönig, D. 328
8. Schubert: Litanei Auf Das Fest Allerseelen, D. 343
9. Schubert: Rastlose Liebe, D. 138
10. Schubert: Der Zwerg, D. 771
11. Schubert: Des Fischers LiebesglĂĽck, D. 933
12. Schubert: Auf Dem Wasser Zu Singen, D. 774
13. Schubert: Nacht Und Träume, D. 827
14. Schubert: Abschied, D. 475
15. Schubert: Abschied Von Der Erde, D. 829

More Info:

His debut recording devoted to Schumann offered a brilliant opportunity to discover the name of Samuel Hasselhorn, a young baritone deeply invested in the art of lieder. With his collaborator Joseph Middleton, he now turns to Schubert, in an insightful program evoking some of the themes dear to the Viennese master of song: nature, night-time, parting, absence, and death. Both essential and less familiar songs are featured side by side in this poignant depiction of profound self-reflection that can rank among the most moving examples of what the Romantic temperament has ever produced.
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