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Do we need to know, before hearing a work, whether it was composed by a man or a woman? Does this information change the way we listen? Does it influence our judgment? With the works on this recording by Orchestre National de Metz and David Reiland, we enter the realm of so-called 'programme music'. Composers proclaim therein their ability to depict, through purely aural means, a non-musical subject. A poem, a narrative, a painting, a scene from a play or even a sculpture could be used as the basis for the score of a symphonic poem.
Do we need to know, before hearing a work, whether it was composed by a man or a woman? Does this information change the way we listen? Does it influence our judgment? With the works on this recording by Orchestre National de Metz and David Reiland, we enter the realm of so-called 'programme music'. Composers proclaim therein their ability to depict, through purely aural means, a non-musical subject. A poem, a narrative, a painting, a scene from a play or even a sculpture could be used as the basis for the score of a symphonic poem.
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Do we need to know, before hearing a work, whether it was composed by a man or a woman? Does this information change the way we listen? Does it influence our judgment? With the works on this recording by Orchestre National de Metz and David Reiland, we enter the realm of so-called 'programme music'. Composers proclaim therein their ability to depict, through purely aural means, a non-musical subject. A poem, a narrative, a painting, a scene from a play or even a sculpture could be used as the basis for the score of a symphonic poem.
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