yellowkrecords

A fresh chapter takes soft, sure shape for Cape Town-based singer-songwriter Wren Hinds on his new album, Don't Die In The Bundu. A gleaming set of gently dappled and poetic songs about fatherhood and fortitude, the album roots it's restrained strength in an innate understanding of what matters most to us: "Let's get back to the heart of things," sings Wren, sounding out a statement of intent. His first three albums were exploratory snapshots of possibilities and influences. The songs of Tragedy Hill and A Thousand Hearts resemble dreams of the music from Wren's childhood - The Everly Brothers, The Carter Family and The Beach Boys. On A Child's Chant for the New Millennium, Wren longs for connection in a world tilted towards digital disconnection, counterpointing the shadows with luminous artistry. Recorded at a timber cabin in the South Peninsula mountainside, about 40km outside of Cape Town, Don't Die in the Bundu is at once a natural evolution and a statement of commitment, embedded in it's title. "This album and the underlying theme are definitely about making it through the hard times, and that strength and resilience is indeed somewhere at it's core." Richly subtle, deeply inquisitive, Don't Die in the Bundu illustrates Wren's preference beautifully.
A fresh chapter takes soft, sure shape for Cape Town-based singer-songwriter Wren Hinds on his new album, Don't Die In The Bundu. A gleaming set of gently dappled and poetic songs about fatherhood and fortitude, the album roots it's restrained strength in an innate understanding of what matters most to us: "Let's get back to the heart of things," sings Wren, sounding out a statement of intent. His first three albums were exploratory snapshots of possibilities and influences. The songs of Tragedy Hill and A Thousand Hearts resemble dreams of the music from Wren's childhood - The Everly Brothers, The Carter Family and The Beach Boys. On A Child's Chant for the New Millennium, Wren longs for connection in a world tilted towards digital disconnection, counterpointing the shadows with luminous artistry. Recorded at a timber cabin in the South Peninsula mountainside, about 40km outside of Cape Town, Don't Die in the Bundu is at once a natural evolution and a statement of commitment, embedded in it's title. "This album and the underlying theme are definitely about making it through the hard times, and that strength and resilience is indeed somewhere at it's core." Richly subtle, deeply inquisitive, Don't Die in the Bundu illustrates Wren's preference beautifully.
5400863096724
WREN HINDS - Don't Die In The Bundu

Details

Format: Vinyl
Label: BELLA UNION
Rel. Date: 08/04/2023
UPC: 5400863096724

Don't Die In The Bundu
Artist: WREN HINDS
Format: Vinyl
New: Available $27.98
Wish

Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. A Song
2. Wild Eyes
3. Father
4. Chasing the River
5. A Wasted Love
6. Restless Child
7. Dream State
8. The Garden
9. Gilded By the Sun, Silvered By the Moon
10. Razor Wing

More Info:

A fresh chapter takes soft, sure shape for Cape Town-based singer-songwriter Wren Hinds on his new album, Don't Die In The Bundu. A gleaming set of gently dappled and poetic songs about fatherhood and fortitude, the album roots it's restrained strength in an innate understanding of what matters most to us: "Let's get back to the heart of things," sings Wren, sounding out a statement of intent. His first three albums were exploratory snapshots of possibilities and influences. The songs of Tragedy Hill and A Thousand Hearts resemble dreams of the music from Wren's childhood - The Everly Brothers, The Carter Family and The Beach Boys. On A Child's Chant for the New Millennium, Wren longs for connection in a world tilted towards digital disconnection, counterpointing the shadows with luminous artistry. Recorded at a timber cabin in the South Peninsula mountainside, about 40km outside of Cape Town, Don't Die in the Bundu is at once a natural evolution and a statement of commitment, embedded in it's title. "This album and the underlying theme are definitely about making it through the hard times, and that strength and resilience is indeed somewhere at it's core." Richly subtle, deeply inquisitive, Don't Die in the Bundu illustrates Wren's preference beautifully.
        
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